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also known as:
Daiba
Address:
Daiba Minato, Tokyo Prefecture 135-0091, Japan
Priority: Low
Location Type: Attraction
Odaiba is an artifical island in Tokyo Bay, connected by the Rainbow Bridge to the city centre. It houses malls, a ferris wheel, amusement park, exhibition hall, television studios, museums and a replica of the Statue of Liberty.
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Wikipedia - Odaiba

Odaiba at Night, Tokyo
Odaiba at Night with Yakatabune boats in the front

Odaiba is a large artificial island in Tokyo Bay, Japan, across the Rainbow Bridge from central Tokyo. It was initially built for defensive purposes in the 1850s, dramatically expanded during the late 20th century as a seaport district, and has developed since the 1990s as a major commercial, residential and leisure area. Odaiba, along with Minato Mirai 21 in Yokohama, are two of the only places in the Greater Tokyo Metropolitan area where the seashore is accessible, and not blocked by industry and harbor areas.

Daiba formally refers to one district of the island development in Minato Ward. The Odaiba name is commonly used to refer to the entire Tokyo Waterfront Secondary City Center which includes the Ariake and Aomi districts of Kōtō Ward and the Higashi-Yashio district of Shinagawa Ward.
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Wikitravel - Tokyo / Odaiba

Fuji TV headquarters, Odaiba, Tokyo
Fuji TV headquarters

Odaiba is a large artificial island in Tokyo, Japan, featuring many hypermodern and just plain strange buildings memorably described as the result of an acid-soaked pre-schooler's architecture class. Administratively a part of the Minato, Koto and Shinagawa districts, the area is now a very popular shopping and entertainment destination.

Odaiba was originally constructed in 1853 by the Tokugawa shogunate as a series of 6 fortresses in order to protect Tokyo from attack by sea, the primary threat being Commodore Matthew Perry's Black Ships, which had arrived in the same year. Daiba in Japanese refers to the cannon batteries placed on the islands.
In 1928, the 3rd daiba was refurbished and opened to the public as park, which remains open to this day.
The modern redevelopment of Odaiba started after the success of Expo '85 in Tsukuba. The Japanese economy was riding high, and Odaiba was to be a showcase as futuristic living, built at a cost of over $10 billion. Unfortunately, the "bubble economy" burst in 1991, and by 1995 Odaiba was a virtual wasteland, underpopulated and full of vacant lots.
In 1996, the area was rezoned from pure business to allow also commercial and entertainment districts, and the area started coming back to life as Tokyo discovered the seaside it never had. Hotels and shopping malls opened up, several large companies (including Fuji TV) moved their headquarters to the island, and transportation links improved.
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